David Moir

David Moir

Based
Edinburgh, Scotland
Born
Stirling, Scotland
Status
Photographer
Camera
Canon 1D Mark IV
“If anyone tells you they know it all, they don’t.”

Beat

I cover news, sports and features. Anything.

One Shot

. EDINBURGH, United Kingdom. REUTERS/David Moir
Dancers from the Nederlands Dans Theater 1 take part in a dress rehearsal for their forthcoming Edinburgh International Festival performances.
“Usually we are only allowed to stay at ground level to shoot the performances but I managed to sneak to the upper level stalls. It just worked as a nice photograph and won an international photographic prize.”

Profile

My first memory of photography is probably from 1986 when I got my first job as an apprentice photographer in my hometown of Stirling. I was given a total telling off by my first boss when printing in the darkroom. A couple of prints weren’t up to his standard. They certainly were after that!

I’m always looking and learning. Taking the occasional bit of advice from my peers. If anyone tells you they know it all, they don’t.

My first assignment was probably a farmers’ highland show in Stirling for the local newspaper. I had a Hassleblad and a 12 exposure roll of film for 7 different pictures. I learnt then that you have to take your time and enjoy the situation. There was also a bitterly cold football match with Stirling Albion with sleet and snow when I’d just started on the paper. Brrrrrrr.

I'll never forget photographing the Dunblane primary school after the shootings in 1996. It was such a tragic event.

Everyone loves a good news story or an exciting sports match. I was lucky enough to cover the Australia vs England rugby world cup final in 2003 when I was working with the Sydney Morning Herald. The extra time in that match was as spine tingling as I have ever felt. There was such tension for the players to get the winning points, the photographers to get the shot, and the crowd who’d had a few drinks by that point.

I take pictures for anyone who will take the time to look. The world is a big place.

My biggest lesson? Without trying to sound like Obi Wan Kenobi, trust your feelings. That and don’t muck up your darkroom printing.

I respect any professional photographer who always does a good job with the least amount of self PR. I cannot stand an ego but I have been lucky enough to work with some amazing photographers and genuine people around the world over the years.