Rodrigo Garrido

Rodrigo Garrido

Based
Valparaiso, Chile, since 2002
Born
Santiago, Chile, 1969
Status
Photographer
“The biggest lesson photography has taught me is to be more tolerant, more analytical, and to put myself in other people’s shoes when I invade their personal space with my camera.”

Beat

I cover protests, politics, sports and natural disasters in a country with frequent forest fires and earthquakes.

One Shot

. VALPARAISO, Chile. REUTERS/Rodrigo Garrido
Two students raise their handcuffed arms at the Catholic University of Valparaiso, which was occupied by protestors demanding changes in the public state education system.
“This image was taken in 2011, the year of student protests demanding free and better state education The image is important to me because of the meaning behind the gestures of the two girls. They are dignified despite being handcuffed, and they have maintained their fighting spirit.”

Profile

My first memory of photography is from when I was 14, at a workshop in school. Developing my own film roll was one of the most fascinating feelings I had experienced.

I learnt to take pictures when I was 12 or 13, through my father and grandfather who had four cameras. I became the family photographer.

The people I respect the most are my parents, for their tremendous support when I decided to become a professional photographer. It is such a beautiful profession.

After working for several national newspapers, I started working for Reuters in 2002 and these years have so far been my best as a photographer. It’s been a tremendous school and I’m still learning

The experience that left the biggest mark on me was the 8.8 magnitude earthquake in southern in Chile in 2010. It was the experience of a lifetime. I slept in the car for days and listened to the painful stories of dozens of people.

The biggest mistake I made during that coverage was keeping the food together with the fuel in the trunk of the car – the gas made all the food rot and since the quake destroyed homes and supermarkets, there was nowhere to eat or buy food. I went for two days with just water and a few biscuits I had in my bag.

The biggest lesson photography has taught me is to be more tolerant, more analytical, and to put myself in other people’s shoes when I invade their personal space with my camera.

When I take pictures I try to keep in mind a diverse audience as possible. If I can make someone feel, bring about change or a reaction with my photos, my mission is complete. The stories that excite me the most are sports, protests and those that have to do with social justice.