Erik De Castro

Erik De Castro

Based
Manila, Philippines
Born
Pola Oriental Mindoro, Philippines
Status
Photographer
Camera
Canon 1DX
“Photography, photojournalism and my cameras have been my passion and my life. I think I will be a photographer to the end.”

Beat

I cover politics, disasters and conflicts.

One Shot

. Manila, Philippines. Reuters/Erik De Castro
Devotees carry the statue of the Black Nazarene during the start of an annual procession in Manila.
“I like this picture because it shows clearly what the 17th century statue of the Black Nazarene looks like. I am amazed every year by the deep religious belief of millions of devotees who come to get a glimpse and touch the statue.”

Profile

A college class on photography and photojournalism opened my eyes to depicting different views of people, places and events through the lens of a camera.

I started to learn photojournalism at a small newspaper called The Gold Ore in northern Philippines. After a few years, in 1984, I was hired by United Press International.

In 1983, after opposition leader Benigno Aquino was assassinated, there were lots of protests in the Philippines. That’s where I learnt, through the mentoring of the chief photographer at UPI.

I believe there is always a best picture for each individual story, but because of the technology now we can show more pictures than we could back in the 1980s.

I get inspiration from the story itself, my family, and my loved ones.

I love to cook and watch the sunset from my beach house.

The biggest frustration of the job is missing pictures for reasons beyond your control.

I respect my fellow photojournalists. We have a common feeling when we triumph and get good pictures that are published.

Photography, photojournalism and my cameras have been my passion and my life. I think I will be a photographer to the end.

Behind the Scenes

. Philippines. John Javellana
Reuters photographer Erik De Castro covers the aftermath of Typhoon Bopha in the southern Philippines.