Edgard Garrido

Edgard Garrido

Based
Mexico City, Mexico
Born
Puerto Varas, Chile
Status
Photographer
Camera
Canon 5D Mark II, 1D Mark IV
“The assignments that I like best are the intimate ones, the ones that touch your emotions and reveal people’s humanity.”

Beat

I cover all sorts of subjects and themes.

One Shot

. TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido/Files
Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya sleeps inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa.
“This photo had repercussions around the world. It showed a president, exiled from his country, who had secretly entered the embassy to seek refuge, sleeping on two chairs. It’s an intimate photo of a political figure in the context of a global event.”

Profile

My first memory of photography is the “Fiesta” model Kodak compact camera we had in the family when I was a child.

When I was a kid, I collected sports magazines and cut out photos to make my own newspapers. Later on, I studied journalism and professional photography.

My first assignment for Reuters was taking pictures of the former Chilean President Ricardo Lagos in "La Moneda", the presidential palace in Santiago. I didn’t have much time to take the photos, and that was a valuable lesson.

The assignment that sticks with me is the 50 days I spent in exile with Honduran President Manuel Zelaya inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The fear I felt made me reflect in a really valuable way on my profession and my family.

The assignments that I like best are the intimate ones, the ones that touch your emotions and reveal people’s humanity.

I take photos for everyone. A picture can mean a lot to a politician, a millionaire, a poor man, a child, an intellectual or someone with no education at all.

Photography is an activity that allows me to approach new people and unfamiliar situations.

Photography will always be an instrument for telling the truth.

Behind the Scenes

. TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras. REUTERS/Stringer
Reuters photographer Edgard Garrido (in yellow) stands with colleagues and supporters of ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya, atop the perimeter wall of the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa.